For many fisherman, spring tradition includes getting out for opening day of trout season and staying out until you’ve caught your creel limit or until it gets dark..one or the other.

Thanks to NJ Fish and Wildlife, with funding from our fishing license fees, the rivers and lakes were seriously stocked to give the experienced and novice angler much success.

 

While out and about walking towards your favorite fishing hole trying to catch your main ingredient, look around carefully, as you may be stepping on a side dish or plant important for flavor.   Wild Leeks, an edible spring ephemeral, take advantage of the sunlight shooting through the bare branches of mature forest and begin growing in earnest.  Look for their shiny, smooth, thick green leaves growing in sets of two to three that make up mats on the woodland floor, scratch and sniff to recognize their unmistakable garlic like smell. Remember to properly identify all wild edibles and harvest selectively to maintain abundance for future visits and all others depending on the plant.

  

Once you have your fish and wild leeks cleaned, head back to camp to prepare them for cooking over the campfire.

All parts of the leek are edible. You can simply place wild leeks leaves and the onion like bulbs inside the trout before placing on the pan to fry.

You may also want to add field garlic/onion grass for flavor and accompany with a cup of spicebush tea.

After the paleolithic meal, don’t forget to sit around and enjoy the caveman tv/campfire.

Don’t be a Rookie, catch a Brookie!  Enjoy Spring.

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